MEDIA MONITORING

Daily Nation: Families turned destitute in wake of interethnic violence

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The brokenness of Pauline Chelang'at, a mother of four, captures the extent of the anguish and dejection that has ravaged families trapped in ethnic clashes at Nessuit in Njoro, Nakuru County for more than a week now. The suckling mother of a four-month-old baby has not eaten for two days. Her lips perform a dance as she struggles to speak, her voice tremulous and feeble. Two ripe veins cut across her temples, signs of starvation and helplessness. When she tries to rock her baby, her hands bumble involuntarily. Click here to continue reading from the original source.

Daily Nation: Health officials extend polio immunisation drive into Dadaab Refugee Camp

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The road leading to Hagadera in the Dadaab Refugee Complex is wide, straight and dusty. Inside the camp, where tin and mud-walled houses are shielded from the wind by dry twig fences, the road narrows as it winds its way to the block E6 dispensary in the heart of the camp. This is the first day of the round one vaccination campaign against polio in 12 high-risk counties, including Garissa. The latest round targets children under five years, who will get the bivalent oral polio vaccine. This morning, 29 teams, each comprising a team leader, a community health volunteer and a vaccinator, have been dispatched throughout the refugee camp. Click here to continue reading from the original source.

Medium: We need a new deal for refugees — here’s why

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About 60 per cent of the world’s refugee population lives in around 10 countries, all in the global south. Refugees often live in the poorest parts of these countries. The global compact is a response to the need for the international community to come together and help these countries that are particularly affected by refugee movements. That’s the whole purpose. We have just ended an 18-month process of intense engagement with all 193 Member States of the United Nations plus all other stakeholders — non-governmental organizations, the private sector, faith communities, refugees themselves, and the World Bank. Click here to continue reading from the original source.

Refugees Deeply: Fear Dampens Hope Among Eritrean Refugees in Ethiopia

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IN JULY THIS year, Ethiopia and Eritrea shocked the world, thrilled their people and upended politics as usual in the Horn of Africa by signing an agreement of peace and friendship that ended 20 years of conflict. Change has happened remarkably fast since then. Phone lines and flights that hadn’t operated for two decades reconnected the two countries, which share a 567-mile (912km) border. Families separated by war reunited in ecstatic celebration. The Eritrean embassy in Addis Ababa reopened and everyone expects land travel across the contentious border to resume soon. But not everyone is excited about peace. On a recent research visit to Ethiopia, where we have been studying Eritrean refugee settlements for the past two years, we discovered that many refugees are afraid of what peace could mean for their safety and their future. Some refugees say that the end of conflict in the region may actually be more dangerous for them than war. Click here to continue reading from…

News Deeply: School Started by Refugees Becomes One of Uganda’s Best

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When he arrived at this United Nations camp in western Uganda in 1997, Joseph Munyambanza had been able to attend only poor-quality schools. Eight years later, he and other young refugee students wanted to help children who also faced dismal education prospects, so they started a club with activities focusing on education. In 2009, they expanded that effort to create their own school called Coburwas – a combination of Congo, Burundi, Uganda, Rwanda and Sudan, the countries of origin for many of the refugees in the camp. Today, Coburwas has 530 primary and secondary students. “We studied in overcrowded schools and were taught by unqualified teachers,” said Munyambanza, who fled North Kivu, in a war-torn region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, when he was six. He was still a teenager when he and other refugee youths started Coburwas “to create [a] homelike environment for the most vulnerable children in the community to access education.” Munyambanza and his colleagues…